July 8, 2009

Wood Magic Mill with stone Grinder

Because not much is written on the internet about the original wooden Magic Mill stone grinder, I thought I would do some research. I purchased a used Magic Mill about 15 years ago for $75 from a friend in my ward who didn’t want a heavy, loud mill anymore. And yes, it is heavy and loud. But at the time, price and performance were more important to me. I have never had a problem with it, and just put it on a lazy susan which helps me spin it from front to back easily. My feeling is that even if something is old, if it works, continue to use it. For those of you that own a newer grinder, you don’t need to read more of this post. However, some of you may have inherited a Magic Mill, or found one at a garage sale, and will want to read further.

The original Magic Mill grinder was manufactured starting in the 60's in Filer, Idaho. I talked to the original owner's daughter (now Kuest Enterprise) and she said they sold Magic Mill, Inc. to another buyer about 1976, and then it was manufactured in Salt Lake City, Utah. So, some of you have different labels on your grinders. Kuest Enterprise still makes commercial grinders and the Golden Grain Grinder which is similar to the original Magic Mill. You can use the instruction booklet for the Golden Grain Grinder for your Magic Mill.

Description:


  • An impact, or stone grinder


  • Has 3/4 hp motor by Dayton or Leeson






  • On/Off switch is on the back by the motor (see silver lever above)


  • Can grind course to fine flour, or cracked wheat cereal. Adjust the stones closer or further apart by turning the loop-ended wire on the back of the motor (see above)


  • Can grind any dry grains such as wheat, barley, rye, spelt, and corn . Do not grind flaxseed or soybeans unless you mix with another grain.


  • If it gets gummed up, grind dry corn or popcorn through it on the course setting to clean it out.


  • Has a top wood door opening with a steel funnel that guides grains to the stones


  • Comes with a hand powered attachable handle for power outages


  • Look at the bottom of the stainless steel bin for capacity. Mine holds about 18 cups.

    Pros: If used correctly, the motor and stones can last for years. Has a manual lever for power outages. Grinds quickly.
    Cons: More difficult to clean than newer mills. Heavy. Loud (consider using ear plugs.) Weevils can hide in stone crevices. Important to run grain through often, so don't let it sit for years. If you have any concerns, Kuest can replace your grinder stones.

    Tips for Purchase:


  • Difficult to find as it is quite popular. Easier to find in Utah and Idaho. Check KSL.com, Craigslist.org, YouAdList.com; sometimes on Ebay.


  • Avoid ads that say “vintage” as the price may be higher.


  • Lists for $100 - $300. Originally retailed for around $300, but would probably retail new today for over $500. If you get it for $100 or less, you got a great deal. If you inherit it for free, consider yourself lucky.


  • Obviously, make sure it works by testing it before you buy. Take a baggie of wheat with you for a test run. Make sure all parts including the pan and handle are with it.


  • If finances are tight, this is a great mill to start with.


  • Ask sisters in your ward if they want to get rid of one since they might want something newer.


  • Great for a large family or those that use a lot of wheat and other grains.


  • How to Clean a Magic Mill
    1. Remove the metal funnel and the metal drawer.
    2. Wash the steel flour bin and the funnel in the dishwasher (or with soapy water) and dry completely. Do not return to the mill unless they are dry. DO NOT get the grinding stones or motor wet.
    3. After each use, brush out the dust with a clean paintbrush.
    4. Wipe the outside of the mill with a damp cloth.

    To get rid of weevils, try some of the following:
    1. Grind a few cups of corn on the fine setting, then a few cups on the coarse setting. Throw away the cornmeal.
    2. Put the grinder in a large garbage bag with a small amount of dry ice on the side of the box for a few days.
    3. Scatter bay leaves inside on the sides of the steel flour bin as they keep bugs away.
    4. It's best not to let your grinder sit for years, but to use it regularly.
    5. If you have an air compressor hose, just blow it thoroughly outside
    See how I grind the wheat at this post

    Replacement Parts and Repair:
    Bosch Kitchen Center
    8940 S. 700 E.
    Sandy, Utah
    801-562-1212
    Sell Bosch products, mills, and kitchen products. Can also repair the Magic Mill. MyKitchenCenter.com

    63 comments:

    1. Thanks for sharing all that wonderful information!!! I was excited to hear that they were made in Filer!!! I grew up in Buhl, ID (which is the next town to the west of Filer) and my parents live in Filer now. :) I just love how GREAT things come from SMALL towns.

      p.s. Filer is so small they STILL don't even have one stop light in town!!!

      thanks again for sharing

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    2. I have a Golden Grain Grinder that looks very much like yours. Mine has a wooden front on the metal catch pan though. The pan is stainless steel like yours. On the plate that goes over the stones with the hole in it, it has a knob with the same design as yours. Mine seems bigger than yours but its hard to tell with pictures.
      I keep mine in the garage and I use the air on it before I use it and then again after.
      I found your site a few weeks ago and have been enjoying it. Keep up the good work.
      Mrs. Olson

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    3. I find that when I run dried corn through it, I have to keep nudging the kernels along--else they sort of "dam-up" and stop dropping into the hole in the steel plate. Is there supposed to be a special plate just for corn--maybe with a larger hole size?--Larry F.

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    4. Larry: I don't think there is a special plate for corn. You could try putting the corn through a funnel that will direct them into the hole. Contact Dela 208-326-4084 at Golden Grain Grinders and tell her you have questions about your Magic Mill.

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    5. Just a few days ago a brand new in box Magic Mill, from 1976, sold on Ebay for $399. Maybe if you ask the seller, you might be able to borrow the pictures. It sure is a thing of beauty, in pristine original condition with the protective card from the factory still between stones.
      Its item #190320945189, in case the link doesn't work.
      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&item=190320945189

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    6. Hd: Wow! I've never seen such a clean Magic Mill. Can you believe it has never been used? I would love a copy of the owner's manual.

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    7. I acquired one off of "freecycle". I was very excited! It also has a bowl with a dough hook attached to it. I made three loaves of bread with it last weekend. Absolutely love it!

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    8. I happened to be checking grain mills on Ebay within minutes of its listing & I knew it would sell within the first few hours. Heck, if I had the $$$, I would have bought it.

      I did recently end up with a set of NOS (New Old Stock- from late 1970's) mill stones. Just for comparison, could you tell me how thick your Magic Mill stones are & what their diameter (or circumference, if its easier)- it would help me in making the plans for my grain mill. Any suggestion on things you would make different on your MM, if you could design it yourself?

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    9. I inherited my mother's very old Bosch mixer and Magic Mill about 17 years ago. I know she had them for at least 10 years before that. The Bosch is just now starting to leak a bit of oil from the center spindle area - need to find a place to get it serviced. The Magic Mill is still kicking. I don't have the owner's manual and have been wondering if I can mill beans in it. I understand soy beans are a no no, but what about other beans? Anyone know?

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    10. Just wanted to let you know that I called the Golden Grain place and they had no idea what I'm talking about or how to fix it, so you might want to take them off ;)

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    11. Sorry, Moonprysm. What was your question?

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    12. Even when my old Magic Mill is on the finest setting the flour comes out coarse. Is there a way to set the stones closer, other than the adjustment lever in the back?? I just got one for free from a friend and there is no manual. Thanks for your blog!

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      Replies
      1. I run my grain through on the normal setting and then run it through again at the finest setting. If you're really wanting a super-fine flour you could then pour it through a metal flour seive so the fine dust comes out but the bran layer stays in the seive. You'll loose some nutritional value and basically have unbleached white flour.

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    13. Hi Nancy: That is the only way I know how to adjust the Magic Mill. My flour isn't as fine as white flour, but it bakes well in everything like pancakes, cookies, and bread. And we get the benefits of stone ground flour.

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    14. Thank you for this post! I just won this tonight at a church service auction and am pleased to have all these instructions!

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    15. Which way do you turn the looped screw on the back to get the grain to come out more fine. I just bought mine at an estate auction and it didn't have an operator's manual. I would definitely pay someone to make a copy and send it to me!!

      Thank you :-)

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    16. If you are looking from the front I think you move the handle to the right. I have a Magic Mill instruction book someone mailed to me but I have not been able to scan it as the copy is light. If any of you sent it to me, let me know.

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    17. I just purchased a 1976 model ($200) in north vancouver canada via craigslist, this unit is in perfect working condition and will be put to good use grinding corn for tamales/tortillas which are in short supply here on the wet coast.
      I would like to ask if anyone else has had any experience grinding maize and what their results were?
      so far i have had the same problem as "larry" mentioned and found that the mill worked better when the corn was fed through slower rather than faster, one thing i did find was that after almost a pound of dried nixtamal the heat in the grinding wheels caused the ground corn to turn to cooked masa leaving me to take apart the machine and clean it before returning to the remaining pound which it handled with no problem.
      another question I have is does anyone know the size of the nut that holds on the primary grinding stone, i think if i can remove that nut/g.stone that will make clan up much easier.
      looking foreword to more great advise :)

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      Replies
      1. That large nut on the inner stone is 30-33 mm but you don't need a tool for it. just turn the shaft counter clockwise with the hand crank tool and it should back right out.

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    18. I purchased my magic mill in Arizona in 1975. I was told at the time not to grind corn in it because the fat content of corn would gum up the stones.

      Becky J

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    19. Buyer Beware! Please be very careful buying a new mill from the Golden Grain Grinder website. I paid for a new mill in Nov 2010, and never received it. They have not answered emails, and have not returned phone calls. The local police dept said they have had several complaints, and that the business owners have been dodging the police as well.

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    20. Thank you, Jeff. So sorry you did not get your mill. I will pull the information from the post.

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    21. **Update**
      It's been almost 2 months now since I bought my Magic Mill and have been using it on a weekly bases, although it took a bit of trial and error to find perfection I have been grinding away and enjoying some of the best (home made or other wise) Tortillas and Tamales found anywhere in the Vancouver area.
      The key to grinding corn is to make sure that you are using the correct corn, field maize is what you are looking for not sweet corn! You must then perform the Nixtamalization process and re-dry the corn before grinding. Once your maize is re-dried you can grind with little to no problems, as stated before it is best to grind small amount at a time as to give the grinding wheels time to purge... if your grinding wheels become hot or moist it is because you corn is still a bit to wet.
      FYI: We have been baking our left over tortillas in the over for 10-20 min.... when crisp they make the best tortilla chips and are a lot healthier.

      Happy eating everyone:)

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      Replies
      1. would you share your recipe for your tortillas? I just bought an old mill and am online to learn how clean it up and to find a tortilla recipe! Would greatly appreciate any recipes for bread also.

        Delete
      2. I make 5-6 loaves a bread every 4-5 days, all whole wheat. When I finally figured out this recipe, it was amazing. I share my bread a lot so I decided to make a video on how I do it. If you have a stone grinder with good stones that give you a very fine flour, you can omit the extra gluten. The dough enhancer is also optional. Fine flour and a superior mixer are the real key. The rest just comes with a little practice and you can get super soft bread.
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8ifbTRKMSc

        Delete
    22. Thanks, myd. Your comment is so helpful.

      ReplyDelete
    23. Ok so I have the option of buying one (I actually currently have it on trial) for $200 (good deal? or not? I'm not sure) but it doesn't have the pan for down below or the hand crank. Is there any place to find replacements of those? Is buying it for $200 without those parts a bad idea?

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    24. Scott - Just a thought, but I probably wouldn't buy one without the pan. Why don't they have the pan? My source for buying replacement parts is no longer good so I'm not sure where you could get one. Or purchase a newer electric Wondermill or NutriMill and a hand mill for power outages.

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    25. Jeff, same thing happened to me. I ordered and paid for a delux golden grain grinder from goldengraingrinder.com (located in Filer, ID) last November. I spoke with the owner (Dela Domarus) several times on the phone about the delay of shipment...each time she apologized and said they were waiting for blades. Now she does not return calls or emails. She seemed nice...I trusted...I got scammed. I too have spoken to the Filer police chief who is trying to help but a civil suit is my only hope of getting back the $587.00 she stole from me and I live in Arkansas so too far and too $$$ to travel.

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    26. I purchased my Magic Mill in about 1973 or 1974. It came with the promise that it could be converted to a hand crank if needed and came with a handle. However, I cannot find my original owner's manual (if I received one), and I cannot figure out how to attach the handle. Does anyone know how the handle should be attached?

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    27. Kay: My husband figured it out last night! It was simple. You must unplug the mill!!! I screwed the handle together, just guessing. He took the handle and put it on the back center post on the back of the mill. There is a notch on the post and a notch on the handle. They have to connect into place. My center post has a red wrap on it. Then turn the handle! You will hear the stone grinding! I have a busy day today, but will take pictures step by step in a post, unless you figure it out first. Happy day!

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    28. This is a follow up from my March 19th post about being scammed by goldengraingrinder.com who is the manufacturer of the golden grain grinder. Much to my surprise, I did receive a refund for the money I was charged back in November 2010. Not sure what changed the owner's mind. It's taken almost 5 months and several phone calls, emails, and reports sent to Filer police department. I am still irritated because I had to pay a $17.00 Pay-pal fee to receive the refund but that's better then loosing $587.00!!

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    29. A follow up to my March 19th post about being scammed by goldengraingrinder.com, the manufacterer of the golden grain grinder. Much to my surprise, I did just receive a refund for the $587.00 I was charged last Nov. 2010. I never received the grinder. Not sure what changed the owners mind but it's been almost 5 months and took several phone calls, emails, and reports sent to the Filer police department. I am irritated because I had to pay a $17.00 Pay-pal fee to reveive this refund but that is better then loosing $587.00 !!

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    30. Can someone please send me a link to download the owners maual for my magic mill? I am also looking for a manual hand crank.

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    31. I just picked up a Magic Mill on CL. It is in pretty good condition. The price was outstanding. I am also looking for a supplier for parts and a manual. My little knob on the funnel is missing. Also my model has a lined drawer.

      Thanks you for all of the great info.

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    32. Thank you for the pictures. I'm still trying to figure out how to attach the handle to grind by hand. Where your picture shows a red wrap on the center post on the back, my Magic Mill has a black rubber covering on the post with no notch. I have tried without success to remove the black covering, but it appears to be meant to be there permanently.

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    33. For those of you who have asked about the Magic Mill owner's manual, or how to use the manual handle when there is no electricity, I will be posting the manual tomorrow! I could not get it to copy, so I typed it up. Check back!

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. I live in Washougal, WA and have a Golden Grain Grinder. It is old and I am thinking the grinding wheels are wearing out. Do you know where I can go here in WA to have it checked out? My address is:
        jewelawilkins@yahoo.com

        Delete
    34. I have to eat gluten free. Has anyone tried grinding rice and using it it cooking? I wonder how it compares to a Blendtec. Not sure I want to keep mine anymore. It's the old wooden Magic Mill.

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    35. Hi! I hope you can help me. My mom has several(( think about 5)and she's had them since the 70's. But now they are not working; the motor on each has gone out; she rec'd one as a gift about 2 or 3 yrs ago, and that just gave out the other day. They all need motors. I'm glad i found your website. Can you advise me where to call or look to find at least one motor? We do alot of corn grinding. I would like to hear from you. Thanks!

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      Replies
      1. Sounds like you could part out some of them and sell the spare parts - lots of posts of people looking for spare parts! Have you tried taking it to a small engine repair shop? After all a motor is a motor and they may be able to fix the existing motor for you. Just a thought!

        Delete
    36. Hi Perlita, I do not know where you can get it repaired. If you live in Idaho, you may try to visit Golden Grain Grinders. Dela at 208-326-4084 Some of my readers have had problems with them, so I would only go if you live in the area. Sorry.
      http://goldengraingrinder.com/index.html

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    37. Thank you for posting this information; my mother is letting me "borrow" her mill at this time and I've been trying to figure out how to care for it.

      Do you, or anybody else know if it's ok to grind buckwheat in a magic mill?

      ReplyDelete
    38. My step mother (no x step mother) told my Dad that he had to get rid of his magic mill because it was cased in particle board and she felt it was a health hazard so he gave it to me. Then she "borrowed" it back and it got "stolen" - I am so annoyed. Thanks for the info. I am going to start looking for another one.

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    39. I got a used Mix & Mill in '84, it has 6" stones, and I am looking for a spare set, we use it every week. Could you tell me the thickness of your stones, we are curious as to what they were new and compare that to the thickness now. The lady put a small "cheat sheet" under the lid, 0-9 indicating the number best for the type of flour you want. Which you adjust with a dial on the front. It also has a 12 qt dough pan with a hook and it has a handle, I do not want to loose this machine, because I have worn down the stones too much. Thank you any help is much appreciated.

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    40. AK Mom,

      The stones in my mill are about 2 inches think by about 5 inches across, but I can't measure the distance down the stone.

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    41. Thanks for the good information. We were just given one of the old wood mills. It's so much better than using the old coffee grinder, which was how we've ground flour in the past. Mine didn't come with the handle to run it manually but now I know I can rig one up to run during power outages.

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    42. Hi! So glad to find this, as we were able to scoop one of these up from my husband's grandma over Christmas. Ours has a 1 HP motor by Lessen, so it's not exactly the same, but everything else is the same. Awesome - thanks for posting!

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    43. I'm so glad to find this blog. I was just about to purchase the Golden Grain Mill and have decided not to after reading that others have been having problems receiving them. I do not have $600 to lose :)

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    44. Had our's since about 1970...

      When the magic mill was first sold it had aluminum oxide wheels/stones configured to break the grain berries before feeding them into the stone faces. This design proved inadequate as the stone edges which were designed to shear the kernal became rounded after time requiring more power from the motor, reduced throughput, and more heat to the milling process. The Kuests redesigned the stones to include having stainless steel, tool-steel blades cast into the stones at the point where the shearing action takes place. The results eliminated the rounding/heating/ inadequate-power problems and is the design used on their mills today. The changeover occurred somewhere in the mid 1970's. The late John Kuest modified our machine about that time and it is still "grinding strong".

      If you have an older machine without the cast-in SS tool-steel blades, you will do yourself a favor by ordering those stones from Kuest and installing them or getting someone to install them for you.

      from a retired engineer...

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    45. I have a setup to grind with a bicycle I can share... e-mail me at gunsonwheels@yahoo.com and I will send back a description and some pictures.

      George Neilson
      Powell 3rd Ward
      Cody, WY Stake

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    46. That would be great, George. We would love to see how you use a bike to grind the wheat.

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    47. Will you post the instructions and pictures of the bicycle set-up for the Magic Mill on the comment section or someplace else on your blog? I have seen comments were something is to be posted, put I can't find it. Thanks for the info on the Magic Mills. I am trying to decide if to keep mine or sell so the info is helpful.

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    48. My inherited Magic Mill just went out. Very sad day, as I use it almost daily. My husband tried to take it apart to see if it was even worth trying to fix. But these machines were made to last and not be disassembled. Therefore, I have parts if someone in Northern Utah is interested or in need. Please email musicmarci@gmail.com

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    49. We have a Magic Mill, the owner's manual, hand crank, and a cookbook that was sold with it ("The Magic of Wheat Cookery")that we purchased in January 1977. It is used for wheat-flour and intermittently for cracking grains for making beer. Everything is still in very good condition and our daughter gets it next.

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    50. I purchased this same mill last year at a garage sale and use several times a week...I hadn't used for a few weeks and when I opened the drawer I discovered a few weevils. eew!!! I took it all apart and cleaned out all the stones and areas that they could possibly hide in...If I was to do the dry ice method or other methods you suggested to get rid of them, how do I keep them from coming back? Love this mill and don't want to stop using it but a little grossed out!
      Christy

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      Replies
      1. Hi Christy, I understand that grossed out part. These are the only ideas I have. Does anyone else have ides on keeping those weevils out?

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      2. I put my Magic Mill within a large, clean garbage bag, I put a twist-tie on the top of the bag when not in use. When ready to use, I just open up the bag and slide it down to access the grinder, and pull it back up when done. Keeps the dust off it and the bugs out. It is in my storage room, so need to worry about it not looking nice.

        Delete
    51. I have a Magic Mill that has a different crank. This one uses a gear that goes onto the motor shaft that protrudes. The crank uses a pin that attaches to the rear bearing plate of the motor with a 5/16 bolt. The crank has an internal gear that meshes with the gear on the motor so when you crank it, the motor spins much faster while cranking. Anyway, I need the pin and gear for mine. Any help out there?

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      Replies
      1. Anonymous - Have you found the parts you need? I would like to have a crank like that for my Magic Mill.
        If you scroll down there is a picture of that type of hand crank at this link. I am not sure how long this link will work. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Magic-Mill-HP-Used-Once-65352-w-Hand-Crank-In-Original-Box-/310714142759?ViewItem=&item=310714142759&nma=true&si=ihS2k8G4h9NRogYUrr21jCJrwGg%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

        AnonymousJuly 3, 2013 at 5:11 PM
        I have a Magic Mill that has a different crank. This one uses a gear that goes onto the motor shaft that protrudes. The crank uses a pin that attaches to the rear bearing plate of the motor with a 5/16 bolt. The crank has an internal gear that meshes with the gear on the motor so when you crank it, the motor spins much faster while cranking. Anyway, I need the pin and gear for mine. Any help out there?

        Delete
    52. I am using a borrowed Magic Mill and although old it runs and grinds perfectly. I was pleased and surprised to learn it had a hand grinding handle and ability. I didn't realize that. I just bought and received a new Family Grain Mill with all it's related attachments and found I do not like the way it grinds! It cannot come close to the Magic Mill in grinding fineness or quality. I am going to return it and try to buy the old Magic Mill from it's owner. Concerning the electric motors burning out. These motors can usually be sent into any electric motor repair shop and rewound or there is no reason they cannot be replaced by any suitable similar sized and powered electric motor. The change over should not be that difficult. A motor is a motor! I doubt the old mills need be junked out. They simply need a motor replacement or rebuild. Check both locally and Online for suitable electric motor rebuild shops. You should be able to have your old motor rewound and refurbished for less than it would cost to replace it with a new motor. Remember, anything that has been made and assembled can also be disassembled. Just figure out how it needs to be done. There certainly IS a repair shop out there somewhere that specializes in repairing electric motors. It might even be right in YOUR town! Perhaps contact Sears or other suppliers about where they send all of their motor repair jobs. You may be able to do the same thing.

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    53. I have a Magic Mill like the one pictured I would like to sell. I am moving to an apt and as I am retired. I also have five 40lb cans of hard winter wheat. If anyone is interested you may call me @ 801-644-0865. Thank you - Shirley

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